Benefits of a Music Education

Music Education for children is paramount and essential.  Learning Music has many benefits.  Studies have shown children who participate in a structured music class do better at:

  • children’s language development
  • literacy
  • maths and problem solving
  • Social skills

Incorporating music in your childs life from infancy gives your child a head start to a fulfilling life. This can be done by singing lullabies and finger play.  As your child grows the types of music games can change to action songs and using percussive instruments to tap out beat and rhythms.

Learning music in a structured classroom uses both sides of the brain and forms connections to both sides of the brain, this aids in problem solving and language (reading and comprehension), as opposed to listening to music passively on the radio or iPod.

I have only touched on a few of the benefits of incorporating a music education to your child’s life, there are plenty of positive outcomes and some as simple as creating joy!  there are certainly no negatives to music.

If you want your child to do well in maths, science and reading start with music.  It seems crazy that music as a subject is being cut from Primary schools for lack of funding and more money put into literacy programs when music is the answer.  Knowing all this information, how could you not include music as part of your child’s education?

 

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Music Games for Young Children

The last week at Rhythm Rumble we have been learning about Timbre.  We demonstrate the different sounds(colours) an instrument can make but using one of my favourite instruments, the Guiro.  We use a Guiro tone block not the fish shape as it is easier for young children to hold onto the handle.  Because of the froggie sound it makes when you scrap the stick along the ridges what better song to sing than Der Glumph.  This song has 2 separates parts.

Part A is slower in tempo and the children explore the different timbres of the Guiro by scraping the stick along the ridges to make the frog sound.

Part B is a fast tempo and different rhythm where we tap the the guiro to make a tapping sound. The lyrics are below:

Der Glumph:

Der Glump went the little green frog one day.

Der Glump went the little green frog

der glum went the little green frog one day 

And the frog went glumph, glumph, glumph

But…..

we all know frogs go 

la de da de da, la de da de da

la de da de da

we all know frogs go

la de da de da

the don’t go glumph glumph glumph

Most children love and know this song which encourages them to sing along while playing their instrument.  But the most interesting angle of this music activity is it seems so simple in its implementation but has so many different learning concepts such as:

  • Contrasting tempo
  • Contrasting rhythms
  • differing timbre on the guiro.

In RHYTHM RUMBLE’s kinder group we are beginning to introduce the concept of echo.  Most of the time children will sing along with the teacher and hide their singing voice behind the teachers voice, so introducing an echo song is a great opportunity for children to hear their own voice reverberate back to themselves and adjust their own tuning.

The song of choice is “Charlie Over The Ocean,” which is a well known song in America, but not  so much here in Australia.  The idea is the teacher sings the first line, and then the children echo the line back.  Charlie Over the Ocean requires listening skills as there is a line that is altered every time you sing.  For example:

Charlie over the ocean   – Teacher

Charlie over the ocean    – Children

Charlie over the sea

Charlie over the sea

Charlie caught a big fish

Charlie caught a big fish

He can’t catch me

he can’t catch me

Repeat:

Charlie over the ocean

Charlie over the ocean

Charlie over the sea

Charlie over the sea

Charlie caught a Black Bird

Charlie caught a black bird

He can’t catch me

he can’t catch me

The children’s reaction to the change in line is hilarious and always a ton of giggles.

Echo songs are a great way to encourage children to sing and not “hide” their voices behind the teacher which develops their pitch and and listening skills.

I hope you enjoy these ideas with your children or classroom and experience the smiles and giggles that go along with these songs

 

Cheers

Lola